Freight Terms

Glossary 1

The actual owner of the freight being shipped, as opposed to intermediaries like freight forwarders or logistics providers. BCOs are typically companies that send or receive goods in substantial volumes, having a direct interest in the cargo.

Merchandise stored or transported under customs control, either awaiting import duties and taxes or in transit to another destination. This status allows for deferred payment of duties, often in secured facilities known as bonded warehouses.

A term used to describe the most cost-effective option for transporting goods. It typically involves a balance between transit times, service levels, and price, catering to shippers with budget constraints or less time-sensitive shipments.

The individual or entity that originates a shipment of goods. In a freight transaction, the consignor is responsible for preparing and handing over the cargo to a carrier for transportation to the consignee or recipient.

A mandatory document submitted by exporters to customs authorities, detailing the nature, quantity, and destination of goods being sent abroad. This declaration is crucial for compliance with export regulations and tracking international trade.

A company or individual specializing in the transportation of large quantities of goods, typically using sizeable vehicles like trucks and trailers. They play a pivotal role in supply chains, ensuring goods move from origin to destination.

A mechanical device fitted to the back of a truck or trailer, used to facilitate the loading and unloading of goods. It operates by raising or lowering cargo from the ground to the vehicle's level, aiding in the handling of heavy items.

The process of dispatching smaller, individually packaged items, often via courier or postal services. This method is distinguished by handling units that are lighter and smaller compared to bulk freight, making it ideal for e-commerce and retail deliveries.

A freight mode where a large quantity of goods, usually enough to fill an entire semi-trailer, is transported by road. This term is often used to differentiate from less-than-truckload (LTL) shipping, where cargo space is shared among multiple shippers.

A measurement standard representing a container's dimensions, typically 20 feet in length, used in quantifying cargo capacity or shipping container volumes. It serves as a universal scale for classifying container sizes in the global shipping industry.

AIR FREIGHT TERMINOLOGY

air-freight-photo-2.jpg

The actual owner of the freight being shipped, as opposed to intermediaries like freight forwarders or logistics providers. BCOs are typically companies that send or receive goods in substantial volumes, having a direct interest in the cargo.

Merchandise stored or transported under customs control, either awaiting import duties and taxes or in transit to another destination. This status allows for deferred payment of duties, often in secured facilities known as bonded warehouses.

A term used to describe the most cost-effective option for transporting goods. It typically involves a balance between transit times, service levels, and price, catering to shippers with budget constraints or less time-sensitive shipments.

The individual or entity that originates a shipment of goods. In a freight transaction, the consignor is responsible for preparing and handing over the cargo to a carrier for transportation to the consignee or recipient.

A mandatory document submitted by exporters to customs authorities, detailing the nature, quantity, and destination of goods being sent abroad. This declaration is crucial for compliance with export regulations and tracking international trade.

A company or individual specializing in the transportation of large quantities of goods, typically using sizeable vehicles like trucks and trailers. They play a pivotal role in supply chains, ensuring goods move from origin to destination.

A mechanical device fitted to the back of a truck or trailer, used to facilitate the loading and unloading of goods. It operates by raising or lowering cargo from the ground to the vehicle's level, aiding in the handling of heavy items.

The process of dispatching smaller, individually packaged items, often via courier or postal services. This method is distinguished by handling units that are lighter and smaller compared to bulk freight, making it ideal for e-commerce and retail deliveries.

A freight mode where a large quantity of goods, usually enough to fill an entire semi-trailer, is transported by road. This term is often used to differentiate from less-than-truckload (LTL) shipping, where cargo space is shared among multiple shippers.

A measurement standard representing a container's dimensions, typically 20 feet in length, used in quantifying cargo capacity or shipping container volumes. It serves as a universal scale for classifying container sizes in the global shipping industry.

INCOTERMS

ocean-freight-fcl-photo-1.jpg

The actual owner of the freight being shipped, as opposed to intermediaries like freight forwarders or logistics providers. BCOs are typically companies that send or receive goods in substantial volumes, having a direct interest in the cargo.

Merchandise stored or transported under customs control, either awaiting import duties and taxes or in transit to another destination. This status allows for deferred payment of duties, often in secured facilities known as bonded warehouses.

A term used to describe the most cost-effective option for transporting goods. It typically involves a balance between transit times, service levels, and price, catering to shippers with budget constraints or less time-sensitive shipments.

The individual or entity that originates a shipment of goods. In a freight transaction, the consignor is responsible for preparing and handing over the cargo to a carrier for transportation to the consignee or recipient.

A mandatory document submitted by exporters to customs authorities, detailing the nature, quantity, and destination of goods being sent abroad. This declaration is crucial for compliance with export regulations and tracking international trade.

A company or individual specializing in the transportation of large quantities of goods, typically using sizeable vehicles like trucks and trailers. They play a pivotal role in supply chains, ensuring goods move from origin to destination.

A mechanical device fitted to the back of a truck or trailer, used to facilitate the loading and unloading of goods. It operates by raising or lowering cargo from the ground to the vehicle's level, aiding in the handling of heavy items.

The process of dispatching smaller, individually packaged items, often via courier or postal services. This method is distinguished by handling units that are lighter and smaller compared to bulk freight, making it ideal for e-commerce and retail deliveries.

A freight mode where a large quantity of goods, usually enough to fill an entire semi-trailer, is transported by road. This term is often used to differentiate from less-than-truckload (LTL) shipping, where cargo space is shared among multiple shippers.

A measurement standard representing a container's dimensions, typically 20 feet in length, used in quantifying cargo capacity or shipping container volumes. It serves as a universal scale for classifying container sizes in the global shipping industry.